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What Stars Can You See on the Sky?

Some people mistakenly think that all stars are the same. However, they have different temperature and colors. Although the stars are scattered throughout the sky, we see them only at night, and during the day, against the background of bright sunlight scattered in the air, they are not visible. But if you get a star map gift, you will be able to look at stars the way they were located on the sky in a certain day. Looking at stars together with your beloved is very romantic.

Do you want to learn more about stars? Then, check the information below. For centuries, the starry sky has inspired people; this is reflected in literature and religion. Some gods have been identified with individual stars, planets and constellations. In ancient times, all the heavenly bodies, except for the Moon and the Sun, were called "stars", and the planets - "wandering stars." The movement of wandering stars relative to stationary ones aroused interest and awe. Since people considered themselves the center of the universe, they thought that the movement of the luminaries somehow affected their fate.

Living on the surface of the Earth, we are at the bottom of the air ocean, which is constantly agitating and seething, refracting the rays of light from the stars, which makes them seem to us blinking and trembling. Astronauts in orbit see stars as colored, unblinking dots.

Sizes of Stars

Stars vary greatly in diameter: white dwarfs are the size of the earth (about 13,000 km), and giant stars are larger than the orbit of Mars (455 million km). On average, the size of stars visible in the sky with the naked eye is close to the diameter of the Sun (1,392,000 km). With rare exceptions, the diameters of stars cannot be measured directly: even in the largest telescopes, stars look like points because of their gigantic distances. Of course, the Sun is an exception: its angular diameter (32ў) is easy to measure; for several of the largest and closest stars, it is with great difficulty that it is possible to measure the angular size and, knowing the distance to them, to determine their linear diameter.

White Dwarfs and Neutron Stars

The size of the star's atmosphere increases even more, and it begins to intensively lose gas in the form of scattering streams of stellar wind. The fate of the central part of a star depends entirely on its initial mass: the star's core can end its evolution as a white dwarf, a neutron star (pulsar) or a black hole.

The overwhelming majority of stars, including the Sun, complete their evolution, contracting until the pressure of degenerate electrons balances gravity. In this state, when the size of the star decreases a hundred times and the density becomes a million times that of water, the star is called a white dwarf. It is devoid of energy sources and, gradually cooling down, becomes dark and invisible.



 

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